Discussion:
a bit down -- healing requested
(too old to reply)
David Dalton
2011-07-24 00:19:55 UTC
Permalink
I'm a little down today and yesterday so feel free to
send me some healing. One technique I use is to imagine
a metal band around the head at third eye (a little above
the spot between the eyebrows) level of the depressed
person and imagine that metal band expanding out. But
feel free to use your own techniques, even prayer.

I'm still on olanzapine and lithium, both of which
have a mild antidepressant effect as well as
mood stabilizing effects and for olanzapine an
antipsychotic effect. Right now I feel just
slightly depressed and a teeny bit irritable
but not bad enough to contact my psychiatrist.
If it lasts and gets worse I'll call his office
on Monday.

It was last quarter moon last night so this
mild low could even be the mild low before a
waning crescent high, but I doubt that.
(See my Salmon on the Thorns page for more
details on my past five waning crescent highs,
the last ending in early September 1994.)
--
David Dalton ***@nfld.com http://www.nfld.com/~dalton (home page)
http://www.nfld.com/~dalton/nf.html Newfoundland&Labrador Travel & Music
http://www.nfld.com/~dalton/dtales.html Salmon on the Thorns (mystic page)
"Here I go again...back into the flame" (Sarah McLachlan)
Lady Azure, Baroness of the North Pole
2011-07-24 02:45:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Dalton
I'm a little down today and yesterday so feel free to
send me some healing.
Don't send me your Clouds, they circle back around again!
rpautrey2
2011-07-24 02:55:22 UTC
Permalink
Study: Anxiety & Depression Result of Poor Gut Health
May 19th, 2011 @ 04:20 pm › Anthony
↓ Skip to comments

MedicalXpress
May 19, 2011



The findings are important because several common types
of gastrointestinal disease, including irritable bowel syndrome, are
frequently associated with anxiety or depression. In addition there
has been speculation that some psychiatric disorders, such as late
onset autism, may be associated with an abnormal bacterial content in
the gut.

“The exciting results provide stimulus for further investigating a
microbial component to the causation of behavioural illnesses,” said
Stephen Collins, professor of medicine and associate dean research,
Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine. Collins and Premysl Bercik,
assistant professor of medicine, undertook the research in the
Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute.

The research appears in the online edition of the
journal Gastroenterology.

For each person, the gut is home to about 1,000 trillium bacteria with
which we live in harmony. These bacteria perform a number of functions
vital to health: They harvest energy from the diet, protect against
infections and provide nutrition to cells in the gut. Any disruption
can result in life-threatening conditions, such as antibiotic-induced
colitis from infection with the “superbug” Clostridium difficile.

Working with healthy adult mice, the researchers showed that
disrupting the normal bacterial content of the gut with antibiotics
produced changes in behaviour; the mice became less cautious or
anxious. This change was accompanied by an increase in brain derived
neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which has been linked, to depression and
anxiety.

When oral antibiotics were discontinued, bacteria in the gut returned
to normal. “This was accompanied by restoration of normal behaviour
and brain chemistry,” Collins said.

To confirm that bacteria can influence behaviour, the researchers
colonized germ-free mice with bacteria taken from mice with a
different behavioural pattern. They found that when germ-free mice
with a genetic background associated with passive behaviour were
colonized with bacteria from mice with higher exploratory behaviour,
they became more active and daring. Similarly, normally active mice
became more passive after receiving bacteria from mice whose genetic
background is associated with passive behaviour.

While previous research has focused on the role bacteria play in brain
development early in life, Collins said this latest research indicates
that while many factors determine behaviour, the nature and stability
of bacteria in the gut appear to influence behaviour and any
disruption , from antibiotics or infection, might produce changes in
behaviour.

Bercik said that these results lay the foundation for investigating
the therapeutic potential of probiotic bacteria and their products in
the treatment of behavioural disorders, particularly those associated
with gastrointestinal conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome.

Provided by McMaster University



Explore More:

Internal Bacteria May Alter Brain Chemistry

http://naturalsociety.com/study-anxiety-depression-gut-health/
David Dalton
2011-07-24 20:44:30 UTC
Permalink
Well, I eat yoghurt regularly.
--
David Dalton ***@nfld.com http://www.nfld.com/~dalton (home page)
http://www.nfld.com/~dalton/nf.html Newfoundland&Labrador Travel & Music
http://www.nfld.com/~dalton/dtales.html Salmon on the Thorns (mystic page)
"Here I go again...back into the flame" (Sarah McLachlan)
David Dalton
2011-07-24 20:45:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Dalton
Well, I eat yoghurt regularly.
and I haven't been on antibiotics recently
--
David Dalton ***@nfld.com http://www.nfld.com/~dalton (home page)
http://www.nfld.com/~dalton/nf.html Newfoundland&Labrador Travel & Music
http://www.nfld.com/~dalton/dtales.html Salmon on the Thorns (mystic page)
"Here I go again...back into the flame" (Sarah McLachlan)
rpautrey2
2011-07-24 22:49:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Dalton
Post by David Dalton
Well, I eat yoghurt regularly.
and I haven't been on antibiotics recently
--
   "Here I go again...back into the flame" (Sarah McLachlan)
                    


14 December 2010
Diet shown to trigger mental illness
by Kate Melville

Changes in diet have previously been linked to a reduction of abnormal
behaviors in mentally ill animals and people, but a new Purdue
University study shows that diet can also trigger the onset of mental
illness in the first place.

In the experiment, mice were fed a diet high in sugar and tryptophan
(an essential amino acid) that was expected to reduce abnormal hair-
pulling. Instead, mice that were already ill worsened their hair-
pulling behavior and the seemingly healthy mice developed the same
abnormal behavior.

"This strain of mouse is predisposed to being either a scratcher or a
hair-puller. Giving them this diet brought out those predispositions,"
said study author Joseph Garner, whose results were published in
Nutritional Neuroscience. "They're like genetically at-risk people."

Garner studies trichotillomania, an impulse-control disorder in which
people pull out their hair. The disorder, which disproportionately
occurs in women, is thought to affect between 2 - 4 percent of the
population.

Mice that barber (pull their hair out) have been shown to have low
levels of serotonin activity in the brain. Serotonin is known to
affect mood and impulses. Garner hypothesized that increasing
serotonin activity in the brain might cure or reduce barbering and
possibly trichotillomania.



Serotonin is manufactured in the brain from the amino acid tryptophan,
which is consumed in food. The problem is that tryptophan often
doesn't make it across the barrier between blood and the brain because
other amino acids can get through more easily and "block the door" for
tryptophan.

Garner modified a mouse diet to increase simple carbohydrates, or
sugars, and tryptophan. The sugars trigger a release of insulin, which
causes muscles to absorb those other amino acids and gives tryptophan
a chance to make it to the brain. Using eight times as much sugar and
four times as much tryptophan, Garner observed a doubling of serotonin
activity in the brain. But the mice did not get better. "We put them
on this diet, and it made them much, much worse," Garner said.

A second experiment divided the mice into three groups: those that
were seemingly normal, others that had some hair loss due to barbering
and a group that had severe hair loss. All the mice soon got worse,
with conditions escalating over time. "Three-quarters of the mice that
were ostensibly healthy developed one of the behaviors after 12 weeks
on the new diet," Garner said.

Some of the mice also developed ulcerated dermatitis, a fatal skin
condition that was thought to be caused by an unidentified pathogen or
allergen. Garner saw that the only mice that contracted the condition
were the scratchers.

"What if ulcerated dermatitis, like skin-picking, another common
behavioral disorder, is not really a skin disease at all?" Garner
mused. "We now have evidence that it may be a behavioral disorder
instead."

When taken off the new diet, the negative behaviors stopped developing
in the mice. When control mice were switched to the new diet, they
started scratching and barbering.

The study raises questions of how diet might be affecting other
behavioral or mental illnesses such as autism, Tourette syndrome,
trichotillomania and skin-picking. He said that before now, a link
between diet and the onset of mental disorders hadn't been shown.

"What if the increase of simple sugars in the American diet is
contributing to the increase of these diseases?" Garner wonders.
"Because we fed the mice more tryptophan than in the typical human
diet, this experiment doesn't show that, but it certainly makes it a
possibility." Garner next wants to refine the experiments to better
imitate human dietary habits, including the amount of tryptophan
people consume.

Related:
Psychiatric disorders common among young adults
Hygiene Hypothesis linked to depression
Adolescent Mental Health Studies Cause Alarm
Dung Critter Lifts Mood
Eating disorders lurking in most women

Source: Purdue University






Discuss in our forum

http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20101113194823data_trunc_sys.shtml
Lady Azure, Baroness of the North Pole
2011-07-26 04:23:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by rpautrey2
Post by David Dalton
Post by David Dalton
Well, I eat yoghurt regularly.
and I haven't been on antibiotics recently
--
14 December 2010
Diet shown to trigger mental illness
by Kate Melville
Changes in diet have previously been linked to a reduction of abnormal
behaviors in mentally ill animals and people, but a new Purdue
University study shows that diet can also trigger the onset of mental
illness in the first place.
Especially when you are a Pigeon in a War Game!
But I need to just ZEN OUT!

Lady Azure, Baroness of the North Pole
2011-07-26 04:06:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by rpautrey2
Study: Anxiety & Depression Result of Poor Gut Health
↓ Skip to comments
MedicalXpress
Anal Retentives, getting Karmic Retribution??
David Dalton
2011-07-24 21:02:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Dalton
I'm a little down today and yesterday so feel free to
send me some healing. One technique I use is to imagine
a metal band around the head at third eye (a little above
the spot between the eyebrows) level of the depressed
person and imagine that metal band expanding out. But
feel free to use your own techniques, even prayer.
I'm still on olanzapine and lithium, both of which
have a mild antidepressant effect as well as
mood stabilizing effects and for olanzapine an
antipsychotic effect. Right now I feel just
slightly depressed and a teeny bit irritable
but not bad enough to contact my psychiatrist.
If it lasts and gets worse I'll call his office
on Monday.
It was last quarter moon last night so this
mild low could even be the mild low before a
waning crescent high, but I doubt that.
(See my Salmon on the Thorns page for more
details on my past five waning crescent highs,
the last ending in early September 1994.)
I'm slightly better today so thanks for the good wishes.
I still have a bit of a throat chakra knot though.
--
David Dalton ***@nfld.com http://www.nfld.com/~dalton (home page)
http://www.nfld.com/~dalton/nf.html Newfoundland&Labrador Travel & Music
http://www.nfld.com/~dalton/dtales.html Salmon on the Thorns (mystic page)
"Here I go again...back into the flame" (Sarah McLachlan)
Dirk Bruere at NeoPax
2011-07-25 06:46:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Dalton
Post by David Dalton
I'm a little down today and yesterday so feel free to
send me some healing. One technique I use is to imagine
a metal band around the head at third eye (a little above
the spot between the eyebrows) level of the depressed
person and imagine that metal band expanding out. But
feel free to use your own techniques, even prayer.
I'm still on olanzapine and lithium, both of which
have a mild antidepressant effect as well as
mood stabilizing effects and for olanzapine an
antipsychotic effect. Right now I feel just
slightly depressed and a teeny bit irritable
but not bad enough to contact my psychiatrist.
If it lasts and gets worse I'll call his office
on Monday.
It was last quarter moon last night so this
mild low could even be the mild low before a
waning crescent high, but I doubt that.
(See my Salmon on the Thorns page for more
details on my past five waning crescent highs,
the last ending in early September 1994.)
I'm slightly better today so thanks for the good wishes.
I still have a bit of a throat chakra knot though.
You have been following this worthless path with made up words and made
up crap for years, to no effect.
Try something that is likely to work eg regular heavy aerobic exercise,
modafinil to lift energy and mood etc, 5000 units per day of Vitamin D
--
FFF
Dirk

http://www.neopax.com/technomage/ - My new book - Magick and Technology
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